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This is a continuation of the Lord speaking from Chapter 23.

...continue reading "Isaiah 44"

Beautiful promises of redemption from our Lord.

...continue reading "Isaiah 43"

The Lord calls out to the Coastlands (Islands/the nations) to listen to His case against them in silence and then to speak their case, if they have one. (Spoiler alert...they don't.)

...continue reading "Isaiah 41"

We now enter a new section of Isaiah. Most commentators distinguish two "halves" of the book. The dire prophetic judgements of the "Old Testament" half, with the tragic end of Israel and much of Judah by the Assyrians, and the more hopefully, Messianic, "New Testament" half in which Isaiah has amazingly accurate prophesies regarding Babylon. This second second begin with chapter 40.

...continue reading "Isaiah 40"

This is the second of three events we see in the "historical interlude" in the middle of the book of Isaiah, all related to King Hezekiah. These are cross-referenced in II Kings 20 and II Chronicles 32.

...continue reading "Isaiah 38"

This is a continuation of the "historical interlude" from the reign of Hezekiah, as found in II Kings and cross-referenced in II Chronicles.

...continue reading "Isaiah 37"

This is the final chapter in the "woes and blessings" chapters (ch 24-35). This chapter is a direct contrast to the previous chapter 34. From Armageddon to the contrasting Kingdom of God and the blessings enjoyed for those who chose Him and are in His family.

...continue reading "Isaiah 35"

In the Ryrie Study Bible's outline of Isaiah, Chapter 27-35 are labeled as denunciations against Israel and Judah, with the subtitle of "woes and blessings". We've spent the last few chapters dealing mostly with Egypt; but the focus shifts to Assyria.

...continue reading "Isaiah 33"

With Assyria (God's enemies) vanquished in Chapter 31, we a righteous king and just princes rule.

(In Warren Wiersbe's Commentary on Isaiah, Be Comforted, he categorizes the next four chapters, Chapters 32-35, the four chapters that conclude the first section of Isaiah's prophesy, to be followed by an historical interlude and then the "consolation"/"new testament" portion of the book. Four future events divinely-inspired for God, His people, and the world.)

...continue reading "Isaiah 32"