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Buckle up. We've concluded the section on the oracles of the nations. Now we're heading into a new set of chapters, 24-27. Just to give the sense of it, here the section heading in my Ryrie Study Bible: THE FUTURE TRIBULATION AND KINGDOM (ISAIAH'S APOCALYPSE). That's quite a title. Isaiah's Apocalypse sounds like the title to a horror film. Previously, I might have been tempted to skim this section very quickly. But I've learned that, even though these times are often filled with horror, they are actually a time of Hope. God drawing every last soul who will choose Him.

...continue reading "Isaiah 24, 25, 26, and 27"

I think humans have a default toward tribal thinking. We view "us" as superior and more cherished than "them". I don't think most people will agree that they, personally, are prone to it; but it shows up in a hundred different way in life. I spotted that thinking in myself when I saw that the next oracle wasn't a terrible foreign enemy, but our Jerusalem. This should remind us that when we act like the enemies of God, we shouldn't be surprised to find ourselves on a list that includes those we're acting like.

It seems like this chapter is related to the events immediately before, during, and/or after the reign of Hezekiah.

...continue reading "Isaiah 22 (Jerusalem)"

Isaiah's oracles against the nation continues with Egypt. I haven't read the passage yet, but I have learned in my scripture reading that Egypt is almost always a symbol of false help and hope and a symbol of slavery, as well as a symbol of "the world". I'll be very curious to see any end time references in these two chapters.

...continue reading "Isaiah 19 and 20 (Egypt)"

Isaiah foreseeing judgment against the nations continues with Damascus (Syria). Damascus is the capital city of Aram, also known as Syria.

...continue reading "Isaiah 17 (Damascus [Syria]and Israel)"

After a long quoted oracle against Babylon and its destruction by other invaders, Isaiah continues his message to the city that symbolizes so much from the past, Isaiah's contemporary events, and all of our futures.

...continue reading "Isaiah 14"

After another pass at II King 16 & 17 and II Chronicles 27 & 28, Israel has fallen and has been hauled away. God has orchestrated a priest to come back and teach His ways, but the people just add that to their previous worship. Meanwhile Judah is still alive, but not thriving under Ahaz. Both book passages end with the death of Ahaz and the introduction of his successor, his son Hezekiah.

Now the Blue Letter Bible chronological reading list sends us back to Isaiah. Previously in Isaiah, he was prophesying about the end of Israel and two beautiful chapters about the Messiah.

...continue reading "Isaiah 13 (Babylon)"

We just finished a bit of a deep dive into King Ahaz in Judah, now the Blue Letter Bible Bible Chronological reading list is having us read about King Hoshea in Israel before we return to Isaiah.

...continue reading "II Kings 17 (Israel)"

Some of these chapters may look familiar if you are familiar with my site, but we're in that portion of reading chronologically, that the kings and prophets don't cleanly connect; they overlap. So one more stop here and then deep into Isaiah.

...continue reading "II Kings 16; II Chronicles 27 & 28 (Judah)"